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New Online Courses on Supervising Afterschool Activities & Hazing Prevention for Students

By Madi McGuire on November 01, 2017 nfhs news Print

New online education courses on “Supervising Afterschool Activities” and “Hazing Prevention for Students” are now available through the NFHS Learning Center at www.NFHSLearn.com.   

“Supervising Afterschool Activities” was created in partnership with the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) and Safe Sport Zone to help schools create a safer environment for students during afterschool hours and to implement school safety with an afterschool activities supervision plan. This course is geared toward coaches and administrators who oversee after-school activities, games and events. Funding for the course was provided by the NFHS Foundation.

Key areas of the course include making an afterschool activities plan, preparing for the activities and setting goals, establishing post-event procedures and maintaining the supervision plan. The course also highlights how to set limits and behavioral standards within practices, concerts and events that are held after school. The course is available at no cost for a limited time through the NFHS Learning Center at www.NFHSLearn.com and the NIAAA Classroom (www.NIAAA.org).

“During the school day, a check-in process and safety standards are in place to get into school buildings; once that bell rings at the end of the day, and afterschool programs begin, that all changes. Oftentimes, doors are left open and there is no longer an entering and exiting process for facilities,” said Dan Schuster, NFHS director of educational services. “This course is designed to provide individuals with effective methods to create a safer environment for students during afterschool activities.”

“Hazing Prevention for Students,” which is also available for free through the NFHS Learning Center, was created to help students understand the importance of ending hazing and welcoming teammates and peers in a positive way. 

Highlights of the course include introductions to hazing and bullying, how to spot hazing, hazing and the law, and how hazing defies logic. The course also provides insight on how bystanders are powerful in a hazing situation, how an individual must report hazing if it is witnessed, and how to monitor areas where hazing might happen.

“The hazing course is designed for students to understand their role in preventing and ending hazing in schools,” Schuster said. “There should be a welcoming and positive culture around introducing students to new sports and activities groups, and we want to educate students on how to promote that culture instead of creating an uncomfortable space for peers and teammates.”

“Hazing Prevention For Students” is the second course in the NFHS Learning Center that addresses hazing. “Bullying, Hazing and Inappropriate Behaviors” is another free course that deals with this important subject.

After starting with two courses in 2007 through the NFHS Coach Education Program, the NFHS Learning Center now offers 57 online courses – including more than 25 of which are free – and has expanded its reach to contest officials, students, administrators and music adjudicators. Since the launch of www.NFHSLearn.com in 2007, the NFHS has delivered more than six million courses.